The Nations of the Crown One-Pound Coin of the Royal Mint

The Nations of the Crown One-Pound Coin of the Royal Mint

The Nations of the Crown One-Pound Coin Is Different

 

 

The Nations of the Crown one-pound coin of the United Kingdom differ from earlier issues in many ways.  In 2017 the Royal Mint changed the one-pound coin to a dodecagon shape, and the coin is now bimetallic.  These features are to help prevent counterfeit pieces from being produced.  The dodecagon has twelve sides, and requires that special planchets be used.  A planchet is the blank piece of metal from which a coin is minted by being impressed with the die on a press.

 

The Nations of the Crown One-Pound Coin Is Symbolic

The Symbolism Includes Four Nations

The four nations of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland make up the focal points of the United Kingdom.  They are each rich with symbolism.  The Royal Mint depicted plant symbols that represent these four nations united as the United Kingdom.  The plants are encircled by a single crown.

 

The symbols are the Tudor Rose, representing England, the Leek representing Wales, the Thistle representing Scotland, and the Shamrock representing Northern Ireland.

 

The image makes it clear that the message is national unity.

 

The Nations of the Crown One-Pound Coin Is Collectible

There Are Three Versions Available

 

The Royal Mint has three versions of the one-pound coin available.  The basic coin mounted on a mint card is available with a booklet that discusses the history of the one-pound coin.  It is the least expensive other than simply taking a nice piece from circulation.  Of course, taking a piece from circulation has no cost, since the coin can later be spent.

 

 One-Pound Coin
Link of Royal Mint Image of One-Pound Coin

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The silver proof one-pound coin is available with the highly desired proof finish.  This version of the coin is limited to twenty-six thousand six hundred pieced.  It comes in a nice display case.  The metal used for this collector grade coin is Sterling silver, which is 0.925 pure.  The inner part of the coin is silver in appearance, but the outer section is Sterling silver plated with pure gold.  The gold plating is used to make the coin appear more like the circulation coin.

Sterling Silver Proof One-Pound Coin
Link of Royal Mint Image of Sterling Silver Proof One-Pound Coin

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The gold proof one-pound is the most desirable.  The gold version is also the most expensive.  This version of the one-pound coin is minted with a proof finish.  This coin is struck in 0.9167 pure yellow gold, and the outer section is enhanced with red gold to give the outer portion of the coin a distinctive color.  This is necessary to make the coin appear close to the circulating piece.

Proof Gold One-Pound Coin
Link of Royal Mint’s Image for Proof Gold One-Pound Coin

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The Nations of the Crown One-Pound Coin Protection for Storage

A Minor Problem

 

Coin collectors protect their coins from both physical damage and from environmental damage.  The inexpensive 2X2 flips will experience some stress at the points, which does not happen with round coins.  This can lead to tears in the Mylar.  The round acrylic holders available will have small air spaces, which is not the best way to store a coin if environmental damage might occur.  And, with current air quality the contaminants in the atmosphere at the time of encapsulating a coin could include damaging compounds.  This will be less of a problem with the gold coins, and perhaps not as serious with the silver coins, but we must remember that neither the gold, nor the silver, is pure.  Any other metal content is also subjected to the same environmental contamination, and there must be protection against damage.

 

Please visit Black Spaniel Gallery Coins to see out inventory.  Also, we have other informative articles, and will continue to add articles at Black Spaniel Gallery Blog.

 

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Find other articles on United Kingdom coins at this section of our blog.

 



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